My Two Cents About Metabolic Syndrome

The Centers for Disease Control estimates that approximately 75 million Americans suffer from Metabolic Syndrome. That adds up to roughly 1 in 4 individuals. And the prevalence is increasing significantly for adults and adolescents. Metabolic Syndrome increases risks for diabetes, heart disease and strokes. The Standard American Diet, which is high in carbohydrates and high glycemic foods (especially refined sugar) and low in nutrient dense foods (especially fruits and vegetables) is likely a major cause.

Metabolic Syndrome, if I understand correctly, is the bodies failure to metabolize food properly due to cell damage from eating too many unhealthy, high carb, high glycemic foods and from a generally unhealthy lifestyle. Cells become damaged and unable to absorb glucose which causes a rise in blood sugar. Insulin is the hormone that essentially allows cells to absorb glucose. The pancreas goes into overdrive and produces more insulin to compensate. The increased insulin affects the body’s ability to burn fat and can cause weight gain and obesity. The increased triglycerides (fat) in the blood stream cause arterial plaque to form. As a result arteries harden and narrow and that leads to hypertension (high blood pressure) and heart disease. Eventually cells become insulin resistant and the body stops producing it (Type 2 Diabetes).

Here are the risk factors according to the National Institute of Health:

  • A large waistline. This also is called abdominal obesity or “having an apple shape.” Excess fat in the abdominal area is a greater risk factor for heart disease than excess fat in other parts of the body, such as on the hips.
  • A high triglyceride level (or you’re on medicine to treat high triglycerides). Triglycerides are a type of fat found in the blood. A low HDL cholesterol level (or you’re on medicine to treat low HDL cholesterol). HDL sometimes is called “good” cholesterol. This is because it helps remove cholesterol from your arteries. A low HDL cholesterol level raises your risk for heart disease.
  • High blood pressure (or you’re on medicine to treat high blood pressure). Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the walls of your arteries as your heart pumps blood. If this pressure rises and stays high over time, it can damage your heart and lead to plaque buildup.
  • High fasting blood sugar (or you’re on medicine to treat high blood sugar). Mildly high blood sugar may be an early sign of diabetes.

What is interesting to me is that the disease is most common in people who are overweight. However, if you have it, then losing weight becomes more difficult. I sympathize with individuals who try really hard to lose weight. They exercise more, eat better, but still they struggle to lose a pound. It may help to shift the focus away from the scale and place it on health instead. Learn to eat more nutrient dense foods – foods high in vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, essential fatty acids, fiber – rich with  antioxidants, anti-inflammatory and immune boosting properties.  Understand that even if you aren’t losing weight, you are repairing your body. Once it’s working like a well oiled machine again, the pounds should come off. Don’t despair and don’t give up.

Here’s a list of some high carb/high glycemic foods to avoid:

  • soft drinks and other sugary beverages and foods
  • honey
  • refined grains (white bread, white rice)
  • potatoes (excluding sweet potatoes)
  • watermelon, pineapple and cantaloupe (Uh, oh!)
  • dried dates
  • over ripe bananas
  • broad beans (What? It’s true.)
  • baked beans
  • parsnips
  • cakes, cookies, doughnuts (duh)
  • pretzels, saltine crackers, chips
  • popcorn
  • pasta
  • cold cereals and cereal bars
  • beer
  • orange juice

It’s probably not necessary to eliminate these foods completely, but rather consume them in moderation. And when you do eat them, pair them with foods that have a low glycemic index, like fats and proteins. (Fats like olive oil, real butter, coconut oil are all good.) Also eat those high glycemic foods in their whole form whenever possible, i.e baked or mashed potatoes with the skin along with some butter (fat) and a dollop of plain Greek yogurt (protein). Switch to whole grains instead of refined ones – whole wheat bread, brown rice, etc.

Here’s a list of some nutrient dense super foods you should try to incorporate into your diet:

  • green tea
  • strawberries
  • blueberries
  • cherries
  • peaches
  • dried apricots
  • pomegranate
  • cranberries
  • tomatoes
  • kale
  • broccoli
  • spinach
  • avocado
  • garlic
  • onions
  • spices like cinnamon, turmeric, ginger, oregano, rosemary, cayenne
  • lentils
  • kidney beans and black beans
  • chickpeas (garbanzo beans)
  • quinoa
  • nuts like almonds, walnuts, cashews, pistachios and Brazil nut
  • mushrooms like maitakes, shitakes, cremini and portabello
  • Greek yogurt (plain, or sweetened with low glycemic fruit)
  • cottage cheese
  • seafood rich in Omega 3’s, like salmon

DISCAIMER: You should talk your doctor if you think this may be what’s preventing you from losing weight. This is just my $0.02 about Metabolic Syndrome!

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About Michele
Wife and Mom of three girls doing her best to lead the family into a healthier lifestyle and evolve gracefully.

One Response to My Two Cents About Metabolic Syndrome

  1. Pingback: Stevia – A Safe Sweetener? « HealthyMamma's Blog

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